Promoting the Economic, Environmental, Health and Social Benefits of a NZ Hemp Industry

Monthly Archives: May 2017

Hemp Flash Press Release 1 May 2017

Hemp Flash Press Release 1 May 2017 – LINK

 HEMP FLASH
Press Release – Hemp seed foods
1 May
2017

NZ Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997) issue the following press release on the topic of leaglising hemp seed food

A baby step when we could have had a giant leap forward
The Chairman of the NZHIA, Mack McIntosh expresses his extreme disappointment following an agreement on Friday 28th April between New Zealand and Australian food safety authorities that see hemp seed legalised as food in New Zealand.

“After 18 years of consultation, the Food Ministers are still treating us like a drug crop and only allowing hemp seed foods. This is a massive missed economic opportunity.

In a short time we could have been leading the world!  And all sorts of industries would have developed not just in the seed and grain industry,” says McIntosh.

The current decision means that we will not have access to the food and beverages from hemp leaves and flowering tops.

“The high value nutrition potential is massive, phenols to fragrances are available from this one arable crop and our farmers want access to the revenue streams from the whole plant, not just the seed,” says McIntosh.

The seed and grain industry will scale up to meet the consumer demand and bring jobs and investment into regional New Zealand.

But the iHemp industry could be much bigger if we include the food and beverages produced from the 20% of the crop left in the field as leaf and flowering tops.

“This is a brand new opportunity for farmers to grow a crop and the region to significantly add value by processing the iHemp into high value nutrition hemp products.  But 80% of the potential will be missed, because iHemp is still considered to be like growing a drug,” says McIntosh.

The NZHIA is well positioned to represent the industry on the cross-agency working group which is being set up.  “We’ve worked with the Government in the past on the inter-agency working group which came up with the iHemp regulations in 2006 so it makes sense for us to be part of these discussions,” says McIntosh.

For further comment please contact:
Mack McIntosh – Chairman 03 415 8888
Richard Barge – Treasurer 021 706 690
Chris Woodney – Government Liaison 027 348 8842

The problems with only allowing hemp foods

Hemp seeds are a super food, Omega 3,6,9, vitamins, amino acids and good fats all in a from your body likes, it is going to be terrific for consumers to have another plant based choice which can be made in to a huge range of foods.
But what about foods and beverages from other parts of the plant specifically leaf and flower.
High value nutrition products processed from the phenols, terpenes, flavonoids in the flowering tops will not be available.  No development work will be done in these fields, this will cost us dearly in being at the forefront of this emerging global industry.

So what can we do: 

Hemp seeds can be used as an ingredient or made into 3 types of foods:

  • Oil – max THC 10 mg/kg
  • Beverages – max THC 0.2 mg/kg
  • Any other product, extracted or derived from seeds – max THC 5 mg/kg
THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid in Cannabis.  The other 60+cannabinoids are non psychoactive and the regulations accept that these are naturally occurring.

The unnecessary parts of the variation to the Food Code

  • Having identified the problem as THC they have set limits as above.  But they also voted to control other “safe” cannabinioids, especially Cannabidiol (CBD),  the “Anti THC” cannabinoid. by placing a 7.5% limit on CBD, where will it end?
  • No images of leaves or cannabis plants will be allowed in advertising only pictures of seeds will be permitted.
  • You can’t mention cannabis or marijuana or words with similar meaning.in your advertising or packaging
  • Can’t mention nutrition and health claims of CBD
The 80/20 situation
  • The minister predicts a $20 million dollar industry for hemp seed foods, this is only 20% of the potential hemp FOOD industry which could be worth $100 million
  • If the Australian prediction is correct hemp seed could be worth 1 billion with the total hemp food market being a potential 5 billion and that would just be the beginning for the Australasian industry.
Who Misses out 
  • Consumers in Australia and New Zealand who don’t have access to the foods and supplements that they are demanding
The background and workability of the variation to the Food Code
  • A problem for consumers who will not have the freedom to access hemp seed (in fact all hemp foods) as they do in international markets.
  • They will be deprived of superior health gains from this high value nutritional product.
  • Commencement in 6 months, but already Ministry of Health are signaling it will take longer.  Assuming a gazetted date in May we could know by November, which would be to late for the 2017/2018 season. But we should be ready to scale up in 2018/2019
  • Why a control on CBD levels, yet we can’t put this information on a label. packaging or marketing
  • Don’t mention THC yet the ministers press release mentioned THC many times, this is a mixed message.  THC is not something we want to advertise due to negative connotations.
  • The NZHIA are very disappointed that the Food Ministers have not been honest about the safety and benefits of hemp foods.  And did not take into account the fact and evidence based approach they say they follow
  • MOH continue to treat us like a drug instead of just another arable crop.
  • There is nothing dangerous in hemp foods!  What are they scared of and why won’t they support this important healthy food source!!
  • We could have been a world leader but for now we only have access to part of the industry. 
Copyright © 2017 New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997), All rights reserved.
You have received this email as someone who has contacted or been contacted by the NZ Hemp Industries Association Inc

Our mailing address is:

New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997)

Po Box 38 392
Howick

Auckland, 2016

New Zealand

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Public Newsletter April 2017

Public Newsletter April 2017 – Link

NZ Hemp Industries Association Inc

Public Newsletter for April 2017 

In this issue:

  • Hempseed as a human food – Vote 28 April 2017
  • Hemp Harvest 2017 – Far North and the East Cape
  • A hemp farm visit in South Auckland, by Anna Harding
Hempseed as a human food – ANZFSA Food Ministers met on 28 April to vote on the issue

Australia New Zealand Food Safety (ANZFSA) authority have put forward proposal P1042 Low THC Hemp Seeds as Food for human consumption.  The 10 Food Ministers (9 Australian and 1 New Zealand) meet on 28th April to vote on the proposed variation to the Food Standard code 1.4.4.

We can produce a huge range of safe, nutritious and natural foods and beverages from iHemp. But they continue to treat us like we are a drug crop.
In this case we are only allowed to use hemp seed denying the industry accesses to the food and beverage markets for all the other foods made from the leaf and bud.

The proposal will require us to hull the seed (whole seeds will still require a licence)  for sale to the public.  It will control the labeling and names we can use, they have even introduced limits on CBD, (a naturally occurring cannabinoid in iHemp) which they have already agreed is safe.  

Human access to hempseed is a great thing for the industry, however it is still a missed opportunity.  After waiting 18 years to get to this point, the Low THC  iHemp industry will still not be able to meet the consumer demand for all hemp foods, as they do Internationally. 

Hemp Harvest In Kaitaia and Ruatoria 

Koe Koea Hemp in Northland harvested their crop in March, the NZ Herald Business news reported on 14 March 2017. 

Hemp Harvest In Ruatoria, East Cape, New Zealand

Hikirangi Enterprises harvested their crop with the help of interested people from the local community.  This achieved their aim to engage the community in a conversation and showed iHemp can be an alternative land use.
A local hemp industry will bring in jobs and businesses opportunities.
See their website for photos and media from the Hikurangi Hemp Harvest 2017


Field trial of Kompolti, with a maize boarder crop Pukekohe March 2017
A hemp farm visit in South Auckland 

In March NZHIA Members from the Waikato and Northland were invited to visit a hemp crop, here are the thoughts of Anna Harding a young journalist. 

Hemp inspired

After reading an article about hemp four years ago, it has since been in the back of my mind. When I lived in Europe I tired as many hemp products as I could and when I got to Amsterdam the hemp and marijuana museum was first one my list of things to see.

This year my brother is planning to grow hemp for the first time. So when he told me he was going to a hemp farm open day, I was super keen.

So one Saturday last month we drove down to Richards farm in Pukekohe. We were the first ones there, and we where greeted by Richard and his display of hemp hats and bags that he he’s been selling at local markets. He also had some hemp seeds in various forms for us to try – ‘tofu’ hemp, hemp milk and hemp seeds.

Eventually around 20 of us came, and it was awesome to get to know everyone and compare hemp notes. Most of us were hoping to grow it for the first time this year, with only one group having grown it before besides Richard.

It was really interesting for us newbie’s to have access to these people, especially Richard, so we could ask face to face as questions came up. From the conversations I realised that Hemp is restricted by laws a lot more than I thought. I guess living in Europe and seeing it so freely made me forget how behind we are in New Zealand.

My brother Mathew, the one who’s keen to grow it said “information about the industry and where its at, and making contacts was extremely valuable, like finding out someone up north was doing a harvest a few weeks after, so I was able to contact them and go along to help out. I now feel more optimistic, keen and confident to grow it myself.”

So after all introducing ourselves,  we went and had a look at Richards crop. Mathew and I had never seen hemp growing before so it was so interesting and awesome to see it.

Some things that really interested me was learning about hemp being a wind pollinating plant, upcoming possible law changes and why they haven’t changed yet, that there are other hemp farmers in the North, and the stages of growing it to harvest.

While Mathew is keen to get stuck in and is applying for his license, I still defiantly have the travel bug. So I plan to go back to Europe after saving enough money again. And hopefully get a job in the industry, learn all I can, and bring it back to New Zealand and start a Hempire!!

Kompolti seeds starting to form, early March 2017, Pukekohe

Copyright © 2017 New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997), All rights reserved.
You have received this email as someone who has contacted or been contacted by the NZ Hemp Industries Association Inc

Our mailing address is:

New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997)

Po Box 38 392
Howick

Auckland, 2016

New Zealand

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Public Newsletter March 2017

Public News Letter March 2017 – LINK

NZ Hemp Industries Association Inc

Public Newsletter for March 2017 

In this issue:

  • Hemp products can only be made from industrial hemp
  • Do you want to work with hemp fiber and hurd – Samples available right now!
Hemp products can only be made from iHemp

Under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1975, Industrial Hemp Regulations 2006, only iHemp can produce hemp products. And you don’t need a licence to deal in hemp products, which are made of or derived from iHemp, which of course is grown under licence

This gives the iHemp industry a secure closed loop within which to operate.

The NZHIA are encouraging our member businesses to start building markets for iHemp products, you don’t need permission from the Ministry of Heath we have the regulations which allow us to do this, so NZHIA  members will be making and marketing hemp products in growing quantities in the future.

As members of the public we need your support; By buying hemp products you  will be supporting a brand new industry, which has the potential to create employment and sustainable land uses.

The great thing is you will be buying and using products that are going to be useful and helpful to you, your family and your animals.

Hemp seed food is a great example and when the law changes to allow human consumption the iHemp seed industry is set to scale.

Make sure you are telling your friends and people involved in industry about the virtues of iHemp and encourage them to get in touch with the NZHIA or iHemp businesses so they can get involved.

Crop of Fasamo” grown in Mid Canterbury Jan 2017
Interested in working with hemp fiber, samples from the 2016/2017 growing season are available

If you are involved in the fiber industry then you need to be working with long strong hemp fiber and hurd.

This season Massey University have been conducting a fiber trial which was harvested this week.   The stems will be run through a decorticator in the Waikato, if you are interested in obtaining a sample of the fiber and hurd produced from this process then please contact admin@nzhia.com

We are encouraging as many interested people to try this new raw material in their process, by involving industry we can grow the market for the fiber and hurd and this encourages investment in the decortication machines and other technology to scale the hemp fiber industry.

Help us spread the word let your colleagues and networks know hemp fiber and hurd are available in New Zealand.

New Zealand industries involved with seed and natural fibre products and processes, need to consider iHemp.  With their involvement we can attract funding for research and development and really move the industry forward in 2017 and beyond.

Crop of “Fasamo” grown in Mid Canterbury – Feb 2017

Copyright © 2017 New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997), All rights reserved.
You have received this email as someone who has contacted or been contacted by the NZ Hemp Industries Association IncOur mailing address is:

New Zealand Hemp Industries Association Inc (1997)

Po Box 38 392
Howick

Auckland, 2016

New Zealand

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You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

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